We Are Not Loco: Ubuntu Vancouver Loco's Last Day

Greetings Ubuntu Vancouver, and friends from around the world. It is with no regret that I make this announcement today, an announcement that has been in the works for months, and on many Ubuntu Vancouverites' minds for much longer.

Today will be the last day of the Ubuntu Vancouver Loco.

November 15th seems a fitting day to pull the trigger on this. It's election day in Vancouver, which means new possibilities and hopefully a brand new mandate for our fantastic Mayor Gregor. You see, Mayor Gregor has challenged the status quo in Vancouver, and continues to do so every single day. With his vision, Vancouver is on its way to become the "World's Greenest City" and is steadfastly committed to ending homelessness once and for all in our city. You would think that all people would like those goals. You'd be wrong.

It's also the day after Jono Bacon's fantastic post on why Ubuntu governance needs a reboot. Jono is an eloquent writer, and it's really an amazing read. I can tell that it is very heart-felt. His thesis: The Ubuntu governing bodies (Community Council and Loco Council) are out-of-step with what Ubuntu is today. He offers a "reboot" proposition as a means to help reinvigorate the community. You'd be tempted to think that all Ubuntu people would like that goal. You'd be wrong.

It's been five and a half years since "Ubuntu Vancouver Loco" hit the scene. What started a year earlier as a small handful of Ubuntu enthusiasts (humans really) that loved to get together to celebrate Ubuntu grew into a proverbial tour de force. I am still amazed at what we have done. When I look back at all the blood, sweat, and tears and the sacrifices that that I and the other core members of the group have made to get us where we are today, I am truly amazed. And, I am thankful that such a lovely group of people exists in this world. My friends. My Vancouver.

But, before we toss the thing that was called "Ubuntu Vancouver Loco" into the Georgia Strait at English Bay (what a fitting location for a ceremony!), let's recap our history:

    Ubuntu Vancouver Loco
  • Founded: March 18, 2009
  • Members: 541 ubuntuvancouver-ites
  • Events: 145 (or 2 events/month, on average)
  • We have never been "Approved" (whatever that means), and have never sought or wanted to be.

You would think that we got to this size and activity level by following the path (rules) set for us by Ubuntu's governance bodies and with their assistance. You'd be wrong.

We got this way by chasing our own dream: To make everyone in this city aware of Ubuntu, to create the largest group of Ubuntu enthusiasts in the world, and to make Ubuntu and Vancouver synonymous. We got this way by choosing our own path. And ever so occasionally, we reached out gently to our friends at Canonical, and guess what? They helped. So much for the conspiracy.

In the past several years, I've been thinking *hard* about ways to spread Ubuntu in our city. Eliminating the problems that are introduced by legacy terminology seems an easy thing to fix.

  • Loco has a bad connotation in Spanish.
  • (Yes, words do set perceptions.)

  • Using the term Loco carries with it a bureaucracy burden.
  • The inclusion of the word Loco confuses people (outside the group).

None of these are helpful.

So, on this day of November 15th, 2014, I hereby announce with the support of our members the "Ubuntu Vancouver Loco" is no longer.

May you rest in peace. Vancouver, we are *NOT* loco.

It's time for a change.

 #

Now its the time for the Vancoighuver to reach new heights of success after the farewell of Loco.

online gambling australia

 
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The only thing I will miss about 'loco' is making stupid jokes like in my subject heading. Or thinking of Cypress Hill and how much I don't miss my youth.

I'm also too busy to read all the 'problems' and 'discussions' but what I do know is that one time recently I ran into a discussion online between four "Ubuntu leadership peopl" and a) they were using Google which was pretty funny (in not funny kind of way) and b) one guy looked like he was stoned and trippin' out on how to get more 'users'. It reminded me of Randall's recent post on the word 'user'.

So, not trying to diss the people who are already in leadership but if this 'problem' is connected to Ubuntu governance then there definitely seem to be a bunch of tweaks needed to to make Ubuntu more mainstream.

Incidentally, I don't now how to dress myself very well so I trust my wife to take care of that. In the beginning it was hard and it made me angry because my pride was hurt. But now I rejoice that I can let someone much better at this help me look better to the world.

Based on what I've seen recently, Ubuntu leadership should do likewise.

 
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I don't think I ever really knew what a LoCo was. I really don't like be associated with things that are counter-productive or extra weight. Perhaps such is this lOC0 thing.

One less thing to explain. One less thing to get in the way of simply doing the Ubuntu thing. What is there to miss? Aside frome the stupid jokes, of course ;)

 
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Glad to hear. All that locoweed was making us crazy.

 
 #

Roger that!

Thanks Kip.

 
 #

Randall:

The proper term you are taking issue with is LoCo, not Loco or loco.

As far as the discussion you cite in regards to Jono's post I have not seen anyone disagree with the 'goal'. Some have questioned if the problem exists. Other have questioned the suggested method of fixing the problem. No one in the thread have done as you have suggested. Do not mistake discussion as people being 'right' or 'wrong'.

I would encourage you to contribute to the discussion if you have an interest though. If you do not want to work inside the Ubuntu community then I would respectfully ask that you at least make valid claims instead of making stretched claims for shock value.

 
 #

"The proper term you are taking issue with is LoCo, not Loco or loco."

To be more precise, I take issue with all of these:

  • loco
  • Loco
  • LOco
  • LOCo
  • LOCO
  • lOco
  • lOCo
  • lOCO
  • loCo
  • loCO
  • locO
  • lOcO
  • LoCo

  • ... and just in case I missed a permutation {(L|l)(O|o)(C|c)(O|o)}

"As far as the discussion you cite in regards to Jono's post I have not seen anyone disagree with the 'goal'."

I have. And some of what I've seen is passive-aggressive in nature.

"Some have questioned if the problem exists."

That too is a problem.

"Other have questioned the suggested method of fixing the problem. No one in the thread have done as you have suggested."

What I've seen is a bunch of discussion aimed at saving or preserving governance, mainly from council people. What I have not seen is broad representation from non-council community members who have been dampened by all the bureaucracy.

"Do not mistake discussion as people being 'right' or 'wrong'."

I make no claim to that effect. What I do claim is that the current form of governance is holding the Ubuntu community back.

"I would encourage you to contribute to the discussion if you have an interest though."

Erm, I think I already have, and I think you've even been party to that. This lethargic discussion has dragged on in one form or another for as many vUDS's and UOS's that I can remember. Discussion this circuitous is counter-productive to say the least. I have no appetite for re-hashing these old ideas.

"If you do not want to work inside the Ubuntu community then I would respectfully ask that you at least make valid claims instead of making stretched claims for shock value."

That language is exactly what I am expressly pointing out as an enthusiasm killer. The implication is that if you're:

  • not loco, and
  • not working with the Ubuntu government, then

  • ... you aren't in the community.

I reject that stance. Sorry.

Everyone who is building Ubuntu is part of the community. And, everyone who is enjoying Ubuntu (but unable to help build it) is also part of the community. You are not the community's gate-keeper.

 
 #

Randall:

When I made the statement "work inside the Ubuntu community" I meant to imply adding your suggestions and observations to the mailing list as part of a discussoin that is open to the entire community and not making additional blog posts.

It seems to me that when others refuse to see the same problem that you do you seek to brand them 'a problem' instead of working towards a common understanding. Is that your intent or have I misinterpreted your tenor and tone?

 
 #

I reckon he's on dairy, Randall!

 
 #

Keep testing the boundaries, challenging our assuptions.
Sometimes those windmills knock over pretty easily after all.

 
 #

Thanks Ian.

 
 #

Yo si, soy loco.

¡Pero solo un poquito!

 
 #

Translation: "I do, I'm crazy. But only a little!"

Unfortunately, most people I know don't wish to self-identify with this.

 

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