I am Stateless (and So Is Ubuntu)

I am part of a team without state. Please don't feel sad for me though. I am part of an amazing community filled with friendly and diverse people. We meet in person and we have developed deep friendships.

Here's a thought experiment:

What if we (the Ubuntu leadership community at large) were to enable and actively encourage Ubuntu teams (groups really) at any geographical level? What if we called them "teams" rather than "sub" teams. What if we "allowed" them to operate autonomously. What if we banished the term "allowed" from our dictionary?

I advocate the removal of geographical team limitations outright. We can and should have teams at the block, neighbourhood, village, town, city, province/state, region, country, super-country (continent), or even planetary level. We already have teams that operate super-country, and others that want to but are actively discouraged from doing so. (Yes, actively.) I can also envision teams smaller than city teams that could flourish if encouraged.

We (briefly) discussed moving toward the "at any geographical level" team structure today at UDS during the Community Roundtable session. I tabled the idea of moving to this model on a *trial* basis to see what (if any) chaos ensues. For an initial trial period, we could try it, say for a single UDS cycle and then measure the result.

My guess is that we (the collective we) are being too fearful of an outcome that would likely never manifest itself. The best way to overcome that fear is with a controlled experiment that results in data. Generally speaking, I propose that we eliminate any artificial barriers to team creation that are not based on data. Any person in a place that has no existing team would be able to form one, or to join another team. Any person not satisfied with a team in their geography would be free, empowered, and encouraged to set up another team, even if the geography overlaps with the existing team. One team in one geography might not be the best thing for Ubuntu, especially if/when that team is out of alignment with Ubuntu.

Ubuntu has no country or boundaries. Why impose them? Are we not all stateless after all? Are we Ubuntu?

I say, "Let a thousand flowers bloom!"

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So, how do you can support them? a new group needs an new identity! What's the identity? it's thier blog, their events, their ceremonies. Now, Ubuntu supports some official teams in various ways: Hosting their websites or managing their events, etc.
In this case, will you be able to observe justice among all groups?

 
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I like the idea of having a team at any level. A point brought up on cities (http://ftbeowulf.wordpress.com/2013/05/15/ubuntu-teams-approval-and-boun...), I'm from New York City and traveling to other parts of the state for LoCo events is really hard. Especially when there are 9 million potential Ubuntu users within the boundary of the city alone.

I'm not so sure I like the idea of not having an approval system though. Although resources such as CDs aren't really used as much anymore (especially since the ISO is DVD size now), if Canonical is still willing to share things like stickers, etc, coordinating with an approved team still seems logical. Maybe it's that I don't want to accept change? Not sure, I worry about the quality of LoCo teams without an approval process.

 
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I think your LoCo is a perfect example of how LoCo's at a scaled down or scaled up geographical location can be successful in promoting Ubuntu. We should eliminate as muc bureaucracy as possible while making it easy for teams to do their work on whatever scale they feel comfortable.

 

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