An analysis of topics that need more amplification in a world of noise.

Ten Tips for Ubuntu Evangelists (and Advocates)


If you've been following my series of tips, you might have wished for demanded one concise summary that you could send advocates-to-be. Here it is!

Enjoy Ubuntu every day,
Skip the technical minutia that causes 90% of people to tune you out,
Pronounce Ubuntu the same way Nelson Mandela does (oo-boon-too),
be Selective when choosing an advocat-ee,
Direct people towards their local community instead of trying to be an Ubuntu soloist,
Never Compare Ubuntu to "competitors",
Know Ubuntu well,
Tell interesting stories,
Give great demos, and
Resist the change resistors!
































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Are you an Ubuntu Advocate (or Evangelist)? The Ubuntu Advocacy Kit is for you:
http://www.jonobacon.org/2012/12/14/ubuntu-advocacy-development-kit-pack...


Comments are closed for this post.
To comment on any tip you see above, please go to the original tip posting.

Tip #10 for Ubuntu Evangelists (and Advocates)


It's time for my next (and final) tip in this series. Before that, a recap:

Enjoy Ubuntu every day, skip the technical minutia that causes 90% of people to tune you out, pronounce Ubuntu the same way Nelson Mandela does (oo-boon-too), be selective when choosing an advocat-ee, direct people towards their local community instead of trying to be an Ubuntu soloist, never compare Ubuntu to "competitors", know Ubuntu well, tell interesting stories, and give great demos. Drumroll please...

Tip #10:
Resist the change resistors.
Ubuntu AdvocateUbuntu Advocate
Ubuntu is a wildly transformational project. In technology circles this is called a "disruption". (Note that Ubuntu transcends technology boundaries and extends to society.) With any substantially disruptive project there will be people along the way that want to maintain the status quo, and by extension do not want Ubuntu to spread.

One might say "they like their world just the way it is." And, believe it or not, even within the Ubuntu project itself there can sometimes be resistance to change (e.g. to adapting Ubuntu's code and processes to make crossing the chasm possible). Have you encountered resistors? How did it make you feel?





Do you have an actionable idea that will help Ubuntu to spread? Don't heed the nay-sayers. Resist the change-resistors and Just DO IT!




Please check back for an executive summary of all tips tomorrow.

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The Ubuntu Advocacy Kit is coming:
http://www.jonobacon.org/2012/12/14/ubuntu-advocacy-development-kit-pack...

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"Ubuntu Advocate" image CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 by "haagenjerrys". http://www.flickr.com/photos/haagenjerrys/339966873/sizes/m/in/photostream/

Bonus points: The Ubuntu Advocate is cleverly inserting Ubuntu CD's into clothing at a popular retailer. Do you think she should be stopped?

Tip #9 for Ubuntu Evangelists (and Advocates)


Evangelo-advocates! It's time for Tip #9. Before that though, here's a short recap of what I've shared so far.

Enjoy Ubuntu every day, skip the technical minutia that causes 90% of people to tune you out, pronounce Ubuntu the same way Nelson Mandela does (oo-boon-too), be selective when choosing an advocat-ee, direct people towards their local community instead of trying to be an Ubuntu soloist, never compare Ubuntu to "competitors", know Ubuntu well , and tell interesting stories. Onward to...

Tip #9:
Give great demos.

Ubuntu AdvocateUbuntu Advocate

Always be prepared to give a brief but interesting demo.

Have a good, clean, working system running the latest released version of Ubuntu. Ideally, you'll want a separate user on your system called “demo” or something similar set up (with no admin privileges) so you're not exposing personal files or strange configurations and settings that will confuse your target audience.

Encourage them to play with the system themselves. Tell them they can't break it. Let them explore.














If you do this, people will see the magic themselves.







Please check back for Tip #10 tomorrow. It will be something I've learned the hard way by trying, failing, re-thinking, and then trying again.

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The Ubuntu Advocacy Kit makes for great holiday reading:
http://www.jonobacon.org/2012/12/14/ubuntu-advocacy-development-kit-pack...

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"Ubuntu Advocate" image CC BY-SA 2.0 by "woutervddn". http://www.flickr.com/photos/woutervddn/5552340881/sizes/l/in/photostream/

Tip #8 for Ubuntu Evangelists (and Advocates)


Evangelo-advocates! That's you!

Enjoy Ubuntu every day, skip the technical minutia that causes 90% of people to tune you out, pronounce Ubuntu the same way Nelson Mandela does (oo-boon-too), be selective when choosing an advocat-ee, direct people towards their local community instead of trying to be an Ubuntu soloist, never compare Ubuntu to "competitors", and know Ubuntu well. Onward to...

Tip #8:
Tell interesting stories.

Ubuntu AdvocatesUbuntu Advocates

People appreciate a good story about your personal journey. How did you first discover Ubuntu? What impressed you the most about it? When did you make the decision to never turn back? How did you feel the first time you met Mark Shuttleworth? What was your first UDS like? Talk about all the great people you've met as a result of your involvement in this project. Talk about how you are helping to change the world.

Let your passion show.














If you do this, you'll your passion for Ubuntu will spread. Passion is contagious!







Please check back for Tip #9 tomorrow. It will be something I've learned the hard way by trying, failing, re-thinking, and then trying again. It might even be controversial. ;)

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Build an Ubuntu Advocacy Kit with us:
http://www.jonobacon.org/2012/12/14/ubuntu-advocacy-development-kit-pack...

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"Ubuntu Advocates" image CC BY-NC 2.0 by "WarzauWynn". http://www.flickr.com/photos/warzauwynn/2362722775/sizes/l/in/photostream/

Tip #7 for Ubuntu Evangelists (and Advocates)

So far, I've encouraged would-be-evangelo-advocates (that's you!) to enjoy Ubuntu every day, to skip the technical minutia that causes 90% of the population to cringe, to pronounce Ubuntu the same way Desmond Tutu does (oo-boon-too), to be selective when choosing an advocat-ee, to direct people towards their local community instead of trying to be an Ubuntu soloist, and to never compare Ubuntu to "competitors". Introducing my next tip...

Tip #7:
Know it very well.

Ubuntu AdvocateConfident Ubuntu Advocate

Learn about Ubuntu (the product) and become proficient at it. Learn what all the pieces in the UI are officially called. Learn what makes Ubuntu unique. What are its "crown jewels?" Look for the exciting pieces that differentiate it from other systems and learn those inside-out.

This part is important: If you are asked something specific about Ubuntu and you don't know the answer, say so. Even better, defer to the Ubuntu community, preferably the one in your city. Someone out there will know it. Don't make up answers.













If you do this, you'll be able to speak with confidence and your enthusiasm for Ubuntu will spread.







Please check back for Tip #8 tomorrow. It will be something I've learned the hard way by trying, failing, re-thinking, and then trying again.

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Have you heard? We're building an Ubuntu Advocacy Kit:
http://www.jonobacon.org/2012/12/14/ubuntu-advocacy-development-kit-pack...

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"Confident Ubuntu Advocate" image CC BY 2.0 by "illustir". http://www.flickr.com/photos/alper/5122329203/sizes/l/in/photostream/

Tip #6 for Ubuntu Evangelists (and Advocates)

Tip #1, Tip #2, Tip #3, Tip #4, and Tip #5 are behind us. And a few of them have generated some cantankerous interesting comments. (Go ahead check for yourself!)

So far, I've encouraged would-be-evangelo-advocates to enjoy Ubuntu themselves every day, to skip Colonel and Yak-like historical comparisons, to pronounce Ubuntu in a manner respectful its origin (oo-boon-too), to be selective when choosing an advocat-ee, and to direct people towards their local community. The tip-fest continues with...

Tip #6:
Do not compare.

Ubuntu AdvocateUbuntu Advocate

Never compare Ubuntu with other operating systems, free or not. When you do, you draw people's attention away from your message and towards a competitor's (even if a friendly one). You also frame Ubuntu in their context, which is usually "just software".

Don't name competitors' names. Refer to their products only if asked specifically, and only in the general sense. And if this happens, keep steering your conversation back to Ubuntu.









If you do this, you'll be able to spend more time spreading enthusiasm about Ubuntu rather than re-hashing nightmarish experiences with other systems...







Could there possibly be more?! Check back for Tip #7 tomorrow. It will be something I've learned the hard way by trying, failing, re-thinking, and then trying again.

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Be an Advocate extraordinaire! The Ubuntu Advocacy Kit awaits:
http://www.jonobacon.org/2012/12/14/ubuntu-advocacy-development-kit-pack...

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"Ubuntu Advocate" image CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 by "garak". http://www.flickr.com/photos/garak/6560558859/sizes/z/in/photostream/

Tip #5 for Ubuntu Evangelists (and Advocates)

Serial tips! I've presented Tip #1, Tip #2, Tip #3, and Tip #4. I've encouraged every advocate-to-be to use Ubuntu (every day), to drop references to technical minutia when talking about it, to pronounce it correctly (oo-boon-too), and to be selective when choosing where to direct your advocacy. The fun continues with...

My next tip:

Tip #5:
Don't be a soloist.

Ubuntu Advo-catUbuntu Advo-cat

You're not the whole Ubuntu community. The hundreds thousands of people in your city who enjoy Ubuntu collectively have a much greater wealth of Ubuntu knowledge than yourself individually will ever have.

So, if you've found someone that you think is ready for Ubuntu, encourage them to participate in the local Ubuntu community in your city as their first step. Help them find people in your city that also enjoy Ubuntu.

There's really no substitute for a face-to-face Ubuntu community and the person you guide towards it will be richer in knowledge because you have done so.



... And, you'll be able to spend more time finding the next advocate rather than installing Ubuntu or solving tech issues!







But wait! There's more! Stay tuned for Tip #6 tomorrow. Another thing I've learned the hard way by trying, failing, re-thinking, and then trying again. (While you're waiting, don't forget to tip your waiter :P)

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Be an Advo-cat! Check out the brand new community-built, full of awesome Advocacy Kit:
http://www.jonobacon.org/2012/12/14/ubuntu-advocacy-development-kit-pack...

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"Ubuntu Advo-cat" image (CC BY 2.0) by "blumblaum". http://www.flickr.com/photos/blumblaum/5005537984/sizes/l/in/photostream/

No kittens were harmed during the production of this post. Toads maybe. ;)

Tip #4 for Ubuntu Evangelists (and Advocates)

In our ongoing saga, Tip #1, Tip #2, Tip #3, you were encouraged to use Ubuntu yourself (every day), to drop references to technical minutia when talking about it, and to pronounce it correctly (oo-boon-too). Whew!

My next (shocking?) tip:

Tip #4:
Choose your targets wisely.

Ubuntu Advocate's CarUbuntu Advocate's Car








Don't assume that everyone is ready for Ubuntu. Some aren't. Since you have limited resources and time, try to gauge whether a person is receptive to new ideas and ways of thinking, generally, before exerting your energy. Ask them some probing questions (without saying Ubuntu) that will help you understand their comfort with and readiness for change. If they seem to be open-minded, give it a shot. If not, move along. We'll come back for them later.







Longing for more? Don't fret! More of my tips for Ubuntu advocates are coming. Things I've learned the hard way by trying, failing, re-thinking, and then trying again. Stay tuned for Tip #5 tomorrow. Guaranteed to excite the Planet.

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Advocates unite! Please check out the brand new Advocacy Kit:
http://www.jonobacon.org/2012/12/14/ubuntu-advocacy-development-kit-pack...

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"Ubuntu Advocate's Car" image (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0) by Tris Linnell. http://www.flickr.com/photos/jonnyentropy/6112073746/sizes/z/in/photostr...

Hey! Was that the sound of toads I just heard? Rude comments cheerfully deleted ;)

Tip #3 for Ubuntu Evangelists (and Advocates)

In our last episodes, Tip #1, Tip #2, I encouraged you to use Ubuntu yourself, every day. I also encouraged you to drop the computer history lessons.

Now, it's time for the next tip:

Ubuntu AdvocateUbuntu Advocate

Tip #3: Pronounce "Ubuntu" correctly.

It's pronounced “Oo-boon-too”. This might sound like something trivial or pedantic, but please recognize that when you mispronounce a word, your credibility may be immediately called into question. A quick Google search for the correct pronunciation and a few minutes of practice is all it takes.















Over the coming days I'll be sharing more of my tips for Ubuntu advocates. Things I've learned the hard way by trying things myself, failing, re-thinking, and then trying again. Please stay tuned for Tip #4 tomorrow.

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Are you an Advocate? Please check out the brand new Advocacy Kit:
http://www.jonobacon.org/2012/12/14/ubuntu-advocacy-development-kit-pack...

An aside: Astute readers might look for Tip #1 dated Dec. 20th on Planet Ubuntu and won't find it. Don't fret. I've noticed its mysterious disappearance too, and I'm about as impressed as you are about our cowardly censor.
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"Ubuntu Advocate" image (CC BY-NC 2.0) by John Royer. http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnroyer/4907112377/sizes/z/in/photostream/

We Are *All* Making Ubuntu - Part 3

About two weeks ago, I introduced an opportunity (a challenge really) for everyone who wants to help make Ubuntu's search feature the best in the world.

I offered this in order to encourage people to participate in designing and making great software that respects human beings, rather than participate in "yet another blog article about who said what about whom and who is more righteous."

There were naysayers. But more importantly, there were genuinely thoughtful and marvellous idea contributors. Lots of them.


Thank you.


Here is a short synopsis of the discussion so far:

  • Background Reading on Canonical's official position, as written by Cristian Parrino
  • Enabling the online search by case
  • Make people aware when they are broadcasting to the world and when they are whispering to themselves
  • Two-stage searching based on whether a strong local match exists
  • Two-stage searching based on whether a person decides to expand globally
  • Give people a yes/no choice to send data outward per search
  • Installation options for more customization
  • First-search checkbox to disable external search
  • Move Amazon (shopping) lens out of the Dash, make it a seperate lens
  • Refine, fix, enforce Privacy Settings
  • Use "bang" syntax to steer searches
  • 
    

    There's more good stuff in there, but I'll leave it as your exercise to click the link and check it out for yourself.

    
    

    Current Pad (12/21/2012)Current Pad (12/21/2012)

    
    
    
    
    
    

    Finally, is the approach that is in the current Dash search the best in can be? Likely not. But, "code is law". And unless we (the Community) are prepared to help out with better code, the law shall stand.

    Go ahead. Add your "code."
    http://pad.ubuntu.com/4OnwYN3HVT

    
    
    
    

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    Note: You will need to login with your Ubuntu SSO account, and also be a member of the ubuntu-etherpad team on Launchpad. Join it here: https://launchpad.net/~ubuntu-etherpad

    Note: Comments to the effect of "you are wasting your time Canonical is evil and we are all doomed" are not considered code. If you have opted out (or given up) this isn't the place to say so.

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