Master Your Social Networking with Gwibber

This is a story about what happens when an Ubuntu local community meets great software and decides to help popularize it.Gwibber. It's one of the gems that makes Ubuntu shine. If you're an avid Ubuntu contributor chances are that's something you already know. Maybe you even use it regularly. However, there are many new Ubuntu users and even some experienced ones who have yet to experience and enjoy Gwibber. What's holding them back?The Ubuntu Vancouver Local Community believes that one barrier to the widespread adoption of Ubuntu's collection of outstanding software is a shortage of well-written and accessible user guides. The kind of guides that give a person reading it a sense of "Hey, this is pretty cool!" or "Wow, I didn't know Gwibber could do that!", or even "This is much easier than I thought".So, back in the autumn of 2010, we set out to create the first guide to Gwibber on Ubuntu. With the help of the British Columbia Institute of Technology (BCIT) we, Charlene Tessier and yours truly, identified a talented technical writer, Tak Ishikawa, to partner with us and to help make our dream a reality.After many months of effort, I am happy to announce that our first version of "Master Social Networking with Gwibber" is complete and ready for your enjoyment. From the guide: "It is impossible to read all the updates that we receive through all our networks... With Gwibber, we hope to help you gain control of your network so you can make it meaningful and relevant to you... We think social networking should be an enjoyable part of your life, not a micro­management nightmare."Grab a copy, give it a read, and share it with your friends. They will thank you, and Ubuntu will grow!Speaking of thanks, please join me in thanking Tak Ishikawa and Charlene Tessier for a job well done by heading over to their blogs and sharing your comments. Check out: "Introducing the New Gwibber Guide" (Tak) and "Be Social on Your Own Terms" (Charlene) about the making of our guide.[img_assist|nid=56|title=|desc=|link=|align=center|width=445|height=573]And finally, a huge thanks to Ryan Paul, Ken VanDine, and team for making Gwibber rock!---All community members are invited to help make "Master Social Networking with Gwibber" even better and to get it into the hands of even more people. We've set up a Launchpad Bug to help track change requests, and to gather people interested in keeping this guide current. While there, please click "this bug affects me" to stay abreast of the effort. And, if you wish to help, please leave a note in the bug's comments.

This is a story about what happens when an Ubuntu local community meets great software and decides to help popularize it.

Gwibber. It's one of the gems that makes Ubuntu shine. If you're an avid Ubuntu contributor chances are that's something you already know. Maybe you even use it regularly. However, there are many new Ubuntu users and even some experienced ones who have yet to experience and enjoy Gwibber. What's holding them back?

The Ubuntu Vancouver Local Community believes that one barrier to the widespread adoption of Ubuntu's collection of outstanding software is a shortage of well-written and accessible user guides. The kind of guides that give a person reading it a sense of "Hey, this is pretty cool!" or "Wow, I didn't know Gwibber could do that!", or even "This is much easier than I thought".

So, back in the autumn of 2010, we set out to create the first guide to Gwibber on Ubuntu. With the help of the British Columbia Institute of Technology (BCIT) we, Charlene Tessier and yours truly, identified a talented technical writer, Tak Ishikawa, to partner with us and to help make our dream a reality.

After many months of effort, I am happy to announce that our first version of "Master Social Networking with Gwibber" is complete and ready for your enjoyment.

From the guide: "It is impossible to read all the updates that we receive through all our networks... With Gwibber, we hope to help you gain control of your network so you can make it meaningful and relevant to you... We think social networking should be an enjoyable part of your life, not a micro­management nightmare."

Grab a copy, give it a read, and share it with your friends. They will thank you, and Ubuntu will grow!

Speaking of thanks, please join me in thanking Tak Ishikawa and Charlene Tessier for a job well done by heading over to their blogs and sharing your comments. Check out: "Introducing the New Gwibber Guide" (Tak) and "Be Social on Your Own Terms" (Charlene) about the making of our guide.

And finally, a huge thanks to Ryan Paul, Ken VanDine, and team for making Gwibber rock!

---
All community members are invited to help make "Master Social Networking with Gwibber" even better and to get it into the hands of even more people. We've set up a Launchpad Bug to help track change requests, and to gather people interested in keeping this guide current. While there, please click "this bug affects me" to stay abreast of the effort. And, if you wish to help, please leave a note in the bug's comments.

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Gwibber is an open source microblogging client for Linux. It brings the most popular social networking web services to your desktop and gives you the ability to control how you communicate.

 
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Somewhat true, except that it requires more than linux to run ;)

 
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The level of quality here is just exceptional, great job everyone.

 
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Absolutely phenomenal work on the user guide, we have been really needing that.

I've been looking for volunteers to convert it to mallard so we could include it with gwibber as interactive help, but no luck yet. Anyone reading this that might be interested in working on that, let us know. You don't have to know mallard yet, I am sure we can find someone from the GNOME docs team to help with some coaching :)

Keep up the great work!

 
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Thank you Randall and Charlene! Good job!

T.

 

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