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Ubuntu Global Jam - Events are Starting to Appear!

The Ubuntu Global Jam (Raring Ringtail edition) is coming! Four absolutely amazing teams have already announced their intention to Jam. Thank you!

I would like to encourage you to register an event for your team for the upcoming Ubuntu Global Jam. Remember, it's happening

  • Friday March 1, 2013
  • Saturday March 2, 2013
  • Sunday March 3, 2013

Please add your event to the LoCo Team Portal http://loco.ubuntu.com/events/global/2221/detail/ so the world can start seeing all the amazing things that you're doing for Ubuntu.

More information is here:
http://randall.executiv.es/raring-global-jam

Thanks in advance for Jamming, Ubuntu style!

Ubuntu Global Jam - Call for Events!

The Ubuntu Global Jam (Raring Ringtail edition) is coming! This event is an incredible opportunity for the Ubuntu community to unite together to improve Ubuntu.

Everyone is able to contribute to the Jam, and everyone is welcome and encouraged to get involved. Are you curious about how to make a real difference to Ubuntu? This is a great chance to make that difference.

I would like to encourage you to register an event for your team for the upcoming Ubuntu Global Jam occurring on these dates:

  • Friday March 1, 2013
  • Saturday March 2, 2013
  • Sunday March 3, 2013

This part is important! Please add your event to the LoCo Team Portal http://loco.ubuntu.com/events/global/2221/detail/ so the world can start seeing all the amazing things that you're doing for Ubuntu.

Good documentation about how to create a successful Global Jam event is here: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/UbuntuGlobalJam

A short video explaining the most basic steps is here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ITk8PGBkMXQ

Gathering Ubuntu people together is always fun and I'm sure you are going to have a great time with your team! Thanks in advance for participating in this cycle's Global Jam event. If you have any questions, please feel free to get in touch.

How to Win the War


Ubuntu Evangelists! Do we want to win? It's time.

A simple yet powerful (marketing) message appears to be resonating in the circles that I travel in. I'm writing today to encourage you to adopt it and then to report back your success(es).


Ubuntu is not just software.Ubuntu is not just software.

It's much more. It's a new way of thinking about how technology fits in our lives. It provides the opportunity for everyone to engage in its production. It respects us. It doesn't deride us and call us "users." In short, it's more human.

I don't think we'll ever win the "war" by trying to make the prettiest, fastest, or featury-est phone/tablet/computer/TV/wristwatch out there (though that certainly helps get us into the game and makes others scramble). We shall win by embracing a philosophy that puts people first and by publicly declaring that fact with both words and actions.

Now, name one technology company (proprietary or not) that can beat us at that game. ;)

Abuse By Proxy

It's really tough to leave an abusive relationship.

No, I'm not talking about relationships between humans, I'm talking about the relationship between humans and the technology that is done to them by other humans (that are in a position to know better and to do much better). I'll call this "pre-meditated abuse by proxy." (You could also call this predation.)

A co-conspirator (that's a term I reserve for friends) of mine recently wrote an article about the difficulties he had convincing a business contact to consider Ubuntu as a sensible alternative to the extremely uncomfortable (and expensive) computing systems that were in use, and by their own admission, barely functional.

When offered a free (Ubuntu) alternative, as well as free installation and support, the contact said "No thanks", repeatedly.

Baffling? Not really. When one frames this situation properly it all begins to make sense. She's not ready. I would normally just dismiss this as a textbook case of "Tip#4 for Ubuntu Advocates"1 but my co-conspirator made a more profound observation, and I think he's onto something.

People stay in abusive relationships2 (with their technology) for a number of reasons:

  • Fear
  • Believing Abuse is Normal
  • Embarrassment
  • Low Self-esteem
  • Denial

Here are some choice quotes from his article:

"Every time her proprietary operating system beats her and her colleagues down, they just accept it like it’s okay."

"I then had the creepy revelation that it’s like the physically abusive boyfriend who beats the girl and after each beating apologises."

I highly recommend that you read his words, as he's really a great story-teller. While you're at it, leave a comment.

Perhaps it's time to shine the spotlight on what (some) technology is doing to people, and to end this "pre-meditated abuse by proxy."





Citations:
1. "Tip #4 for Ubuntu Evangelists" http://randall.executiv.es/tip4
2. "Why Do People Stay in Abusive Relationships?"
http://www.loveisrespect.org/is-this-abuse/why-do-people-stay-in-abusive-relationships

Credits:
a. Thanks "wayneoutthere" for inspiring this article and for the permission to paraphrase it.
b. Thanks "hang_in_there" for the image.CC BY 2.0. http://www.flickr.com/photos/59632563@N04/6238711264/sizes/z/in/photostream/

It's 2013! Quick! Phone All Your Friends!

Happy New Year everyone!

The year is off to quite a fun start. You've likely seen the announcements about the Ubuntu Phone (without needing any robot). Finally. Ignore the fact that a lot of "the press" (that is sponsored by competitors - check the ads) isn't quite getting the significance of this. (That's a topic for a future post.)

For us, here's Mark explaining it all in a very clear way:


http://www.viddler.com/v/ac8413f3

So, now we have a phone and a tablet, with the exact same interfaces that match the desktop. And soon a TV. No need to learn new interfaces across devices. One interface that spans everything. One project that spans everything.

Please tell all your friends, especially those who think Ubuntu is just software. Heck, call a reporter and explain what Ubuntu really represents.

Randall's prediction: 2013 will be the year we introduce people to systems that work for people, and not vice-versa.

Ten Tips for Ubuntu Evangelists (and Advocates)


If you've been following my series of tips, you might have wished for demanded one concise summary that you could send advocates-to-be. Here it is!

Enjoy Ubuntu every day,
Skip the technical minutia that causes 90% of people to tune you out,
Pronounce Ubuntu the same way Nelson Mandela does (oo-boon-too),
be Selective when choosing an advocat-ee,
Direct people towards their local community instead of trying to be an Ubuntu soloist,
Never Compare Ubuntu to "competitors",
Know Ubuntu well,
Tell interesting stories,
Give great demos, and
Resist the change resistors!
































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Are you an Ubuntu Advocate (or Evangelist)? The Ubuntu Advocacy Kit is for you:
http://www.jonobacon.org/2012/12/14/ubuntu-advocacy-development-kit-pack...


Comments are closed for this post.
To comment on any tip you see above, please go to the original tip posting.

Tip #10 for Ubuntu Evangelists (and Advocates)


It's time for my next (and final) tip in this series. Before that, a recap:

Enjoy Ubuntu every day, skip the technical minutia that causes 90% of people to tune you out, pronounce Ubuntu the same way Nelson Mandela does (oo-boon-too), be selective when choosing an advocat-ee, direct people towards their local community instead of trying to be an Ubuntu soloist, never compare Ubuntu to "competitors", know Ubuntu well, tell interesting stories, and give great demos. Drumroll please...

Tip #10:
Resist the change resistors.
Ubuntu AdvocateUbuntu Advocate
Ubuntu is a wildly transformational project. In technology circles this is called a "disruption". (Note that Ubuntu transcends technology boundaries and extends to society.) With any substantially disruptive project there will be people along the way that want to maintain the status quo, and by extension do not want Ubuntu to spread.

One might say "they like their world just the way it is." And, believe it or not, even within the Ubuntu project itself there can sometimes be resistance to change (e.g. to adapting Ubuntu's code and processes to make crossing the chasm possible). Have you encountered resistors? How did it make you feel?





Do you have an actionable idea that will help Ubuntu to spread? Don't heed the nay-sayers. Resist the change-resistors and Just DO IT!




Please check back for an executive summary of all tips tomorrow.

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The Ubuntu Advocacy Kit is coming:
http://www.jonobacon.org/2012/12/14/ubuntu-advocacy-development-kit-pack...

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"Ubuntu Advocate" image CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 by "haagenjerrys". http://www.flickr.com/photos/haagenjerrys/339966873/sizes/m/in/photostream/

Bonus points: The Ubuntu Advocate is cleverly inserting Ubuntu CD's into clothing at a popular retailer. Do you think she should be stopped?

Tip #9 for Ubuntu Evangelists (and Advocates)


Evangelo-advocates! It's time for Tip #9. Before that though, here's a short recap of what I've shared so far.

Enjoy Ubuntu every day, skip the technical minutia that causes 90% of people to tune you out, pronounce Ubuntu the same way Nelson Mandela does (oo-boon-too), be selective when choosing an advocat-ee, direct people towards their local community instead of trying to be an Ubuntu soloist, never compare Ubuntu to "competitors", know Ubuntu well , and tell interesting stories. Onward to...

Tip #9:
Give great demos.

Ubuntu AdvocateUbuntu Advocate

Always be prepared to give a brief but interesting demo.

Have a good, clean, working system running the latest released version of Ubuntu. Ideally, you'll want a separate user on your system called “demo” or something similar set up (with no admin privileges) so you're not exposing personal files or strange configurations and settings that will confuse your target audience.

Encourage them to play with the system themselves. Tell them they can't break it. Let them explore.














If you do this, people will see the magic themselves.







Please check back for Tip #10 tomorrow. It will be something I've learned the hard way by trying, failing, re-thinking, and then trying again.

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The Ubuntu Advocacy Kit makes for great holiday reading:
http://www.jonobacon.org/2012/12/14/ubuntu-advocacy-development-kit-pack...

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"Ubuntu Advocate" image CC BY-SA 2.0 by "woutervddn". http://www.flickr.com/photos/woutervddn/5552340881/sizes/l/in/photostream/

Tip #8 for Ubuntu Evangelists (and Advocates)


Evangelo-advocates! That's you!

Enjoy Ubuntu every day, skip the technical minutia that causes 90% of people to tune you out, pronounce Ubuntu the same way Nelson Mandela does (oo-boon-too), be selective when choosing an advocat-ee, direct people towards their local community instead of trying to be an Ubuntu soloist, never compare Ubuntu to "competitors", and know Ubuntu well. Onward to...

Tip #8:
Tell interesting stories.

Ubuntu AdvocatesUbuntu Advocates

People appreciate a good story about your personal journey. How did you first discover Ubuntu? What impressed you the most about it? When did you make the decision to never turn back? How did you feel the first time you met Mark Shuttleworth? What was your first UDS like? Talk about all the great people you've met as a result of your involvement in this project. Talk about how you are helping to change the world.

Let your passion show.














If you do this, you'll your passion for Ubuntu will spread. Passion is contagious!







Please check back for Tip #9 tomorrow. It will be something I've learned the hard way by trying, failing, re-thinking, and then trying again. It might even be controversial. ;)

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Build an Ubuntu Advocacy Kit with us:
http://www.jonobacon.org/2012/12/14/ubuntu-advocacy-development-kit-pack...

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"Ubuntu Advocates" image CC BY-NC 2.0 by "WarzauWynn". http://www.flickr.com/photos/warzauwynn/2362722775/sizes/l/in/photostream/

Tip #7 for Ubuntu Evangelists (and Advocates)

So far, I've encouraged would-be-evangelo-advocates (that's you!) to enjoy Ubuntu every day, to skip the technical minutia that causes 90% of the population to cringe, to pronounce Ubuntu the same way Desmond Tutu does (oo-boon-too), to be selective when choosing an advocat-ee, to direct people towards their local community instead of trying to be an Ubuntu soloist, and to never compare Ubuntu to "competitors". Introducing my next tip...

Tip #7:
Know it very well.

Ubuntu AdvocateConfident Ubuntu Advocate

Learn about Ubuntu (the product) and become proficient at it. Learn what all the pieces in the UI are officially called. Learn what makes Ubuntu unique. What are its "crown jewels?" Look for the exciting pieces that differentiate it from other systems and learn those inside-out.

This part is important: If you are asked something specific about Ubuntu and you don't know the answer, say so. Even better, defer to the Ubuntu community, preferably the one in your city. Someone out there will know it. Don't make up answers.













If you do this, you'll be able to speak with confidence and your enthusiasm for Ubuntu will spread.







Please check back for Tip #8 tomorrow. It will be something I've learned the hard way by trying, failing, re-thinking, and then trying again.

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Have you heard? We're building an Ubuntu Advocacy Kit:
http://www.jonobacon.org/2012/12/14/ubuntu-advocacy-development-kit-pack...

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"Confident Ubuntu Advocate" image CC BY 2.0 by "illustir". http://www.flickr.com/photos/alper/5122329203/sizes/l/in/photostream/

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